Electrical wiring

In modern domestic properties in the UK, the main electric lighting circuits are separate from the power ring main circuit. Each house should ideally have at least two lighting circuits; each protected by a 5 amp fuse or 6 amp trip in the consumer unit. A single 5/6 amp circuit can cope with up to twelve 100 watt lamps, it is usual in a multi-storey house, to have at least one lighting circuit for each floor even if the number of lamps are less than 12 on each level.

Shaver units may also be connected to the lighting circuit (treat it as equivalent to one 100 watt lamp) – where installed in a bathroom or a room containing a shower, the shaver unit must incorporate an isolating transformer.

Pat testing or portable appliance testing is an important part of any health & safety policy. This site is intended as a guide to both the legal implications and to the technical requirements.

The Health & Safety Executive states that 25% of all reportable electrical accidents involve portable appliances. The Electricity at Work Regulations place a legal responsibility on employers, employees and self-employed persons to comply with the provisions of the regulations and take reasonably practicable steps to ensure that no danger results from the use of such equipment. This in effect requires the implementation of a systematic and regular program of maintenance, inspection and testing. The Health & Safety at Work Act (1974) places such an obligation in the following circumstances:

* 1. Where appliances are used by employees.

* 2. Where the public may use appliances in establishments such as hospitals, schools, hotels, shops etc.

* 3. Where appliances are supplied or hired.

* 4. Where appliances are repaired or serviced.

The level of inspection and testing required is dependant upon the risk of the appliance becoming faulty, which is in turn dependant upon the type of appliance, the nature of its use and the environment in which it is used.